9th Experimental Archaeology Conference abstract – Warren and Murphy

“buildingmesolithic”: recent experimental reconstructions of Mesolithic houses in Ireland Graeme Warren and John Murphy University College Dublin This paper reviews two recent experimental archaeological reconstructions of Mesolithic houses in Ireland. Both houses were based closely on the ground plan of the first known Mesolithic site in Ireland, Mt Sandel, excavated by Prof. Peter Woodman (Woodman … Continue reading

9th Experimental Archaeology Conference abstract – Gilhooly

A Study of Prehistoric Irish Shale and Porcellanite Axes/Adzes through Experimentation, Quantification and Comparative Analysis Bernard Gilhooly University College Dublin This paper will discuss the methodological approaches currently being applied to the analysis of particular lithologies of prehistoric Irish axes/adzes and the range of skill sets developed to accomplish this. As part of an ongoing … Continue reading

9th Experimental Archaeology Conference abstract – Molloy and Wisniewski

Look with your eyes, not with your hands? Combining 3D visualisation and kinaesthetic methods for understanding use-wear on prehistoric metalwork Barry Molloy and Mariusz Wisniewski University College Dublin Since the beginnings of Experimental Archaeology, there has been an uneasy tension surrounding the role of the investigator. The scientific ethos of the New Archaeology tradition sought … Continue reading

9th Experimental Archaeology Conference abstract – Clarke and Inwood

Cremation in Irish Neolothic tombs copyright Clarke and Inwood

Creation and Cremation: Understanding ritual use of Neolithic material culture of the Irish passage tomb tradition in relation to the cremation process Tara Clarke & Niall Inwood University College Dublin During the Irish Neolithic the primary form of burial practice is cremation. Associated with this practice from c.3300-2700 is the construction and primary use of … Continue reading

7th Experimental Archaeology Conference Abstract – Bernard Gilhooly

Neither Rough nor Tuff; an Experimental Approach to Understanding the Durability of Prehistoric Irish Shale Axes Bernard Gilhooly University College Dublin, School of Archaeology Shale was the second most popular lithology used in Irish prehistory for the production of axeheads (Cooney & Mandal, forthcoming). Yet, as a fine-grained sedimentary stone, there have been questions about … Continue reading